Sea Crow Press Welcomes Author Aline Lindemann

Sea Crow Press is growing!

Aline Lindemann is an artist and writer whose work honors and explores the intersection of spirituality and nature with a special emphasis on the meaning of home. Though she has traveled far and wide both for pleasure and in service to nonprofits that provide for displaced people seeking refuge in unfamiliar lands, it is her beloved Cape Cod home and an unceasing fascination with the sea that inspire and pervade her art and her writing. 

In her own words

I’m absolutely delighted to join Sea Crow Press with my forthcoming book DRIFT, a collection of poems and narratives that linger in moments when time morphs into something simultaneously spirit-filled and sluggish: observing the incoming tide, watching a grown child paddle out to sea, or the stupefying feeling of ineptness in the face of a broken world. This collection notices, and even celebrates those brief instances when the inextricable link between nature and spirit are so apparent. 

As a longtime artist, writer, spiritual seeker and religious studies professor, I’m quite comfortable hanging out in the abstract spaces between creeds and questions, certainty and skepticism. Many of the pieces in this collection are informed by countless hours of contemplation along the shores of Cape Cod, and several emerged from repeated trips to refugee camps in Greece where so many Yazidi people befriended me and shared their stories of hardship and determination. I learned more from them and their innate knowledge of themselves as integral members of nature’s grand oneness than they will ever know.  

Blessed to have lived many years in the deserts of Arizona, and now on the shores of Cape Cod, my faith journey, the natural beauty of the Cape, and all who drift, whether deeper within or across unknown lands in search of rest, are constant sources of inspiration. 

Aline Lindemann studied and taught for many years at Arizona State University, Ottawa University and the Religious Literacy Project at Harvard Divinity School. She currently owns a small boutique on Cape Cod called Cottage that celebrates the beauty of vintage goods and new art by local artists. 

Seasons Change and So Do We

As Labor Day approached, we dreaded summer’s ending.

In my youth, as Labor Day approached, we dreaded summer’s ending and counted the days of freedom remaining before school resumed. Now we still count the days until Labor Day, but for a different reason!

The Labor Day holiday no longer rings down the final curtain on summer.

Formerly, the day after Labor Day was almost eerily quiet. If there was still some traffic around, my mother would remark, “They haven’t all gone home yet!”

Seasonal shops and restaurants would be closed, and we would have to wait another year to satisfy our ice cream cravings. Outdoor fairs were over; clambakes and cookouts had become only fond memories. 


Now, Labor Day ushers in the shoulder season, which brings a new crop of visitors or extends the stays of visitors already here.

Many seasonal businesses stay open until Columbus Day, at least on the weekends, and inns have not yet gone to off-season rates. Farmers markets, which did not exist in most Cape towns during my adolescence, display their beautiful fall produce. There are a few more opportunities for fried clams and soft-serve. Although traffic congestion may ease a bit, it doesn’t disappear. 

The spectacular Cape autumns were a well-kept secret for decades, but few secrets can be kept forever. 

Mary E. McDermott is a 13th-generation Cape Codder living in Orleans. She worked for 17 years in the Orleans Assessor’s Office and 23 years as a commercial insurance broker at Pike Insurance Agency. She has been a justice of the peace to solemnize marriages since 1976 and has previously published two books of poetry, Tapestry and Handle with Care. Her poems have appeared in several publications including the Christian Science Monitor.
Read more about Cape Cod in Mary E. McDermott’s book Old Orleans, Memories of a Cape Cod Town.

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Take a Cape Cod book to the beach with Moon Tide: Cape Cod Poems by Mary Petiet.

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Let Cape Cod inspire you.

Find inspiration in the rising sun, poetry flowing with the tide, and beautiful prose emerging from the gentle fog. Cape Cod: A Writer’s Journal, a new book by Mary Petiet.

The 20 prompts and inspirational quotes in this interactive journal were designed by a Cape Cod writer to connect you to your muse so you can capture the beauty of Cape Cod on paper. Each prompt leads you to your personal writing style as you cover the blank pages of this pocket sized journal with your deepest thoughts and insights. It’s designed to fit in your pocket, so take it with you as you travel Cape Cod, and if you’re far away rely upon it to transport you to these shores which have always worked their magic on the written word.

Summer on Old Cape Cod

What was summer like on Old Cape Cod?

During my youth, Orleans boasted many summer camps, several of which specialized in sailing. Young people came from everywhere to attend the camps and develop skills in swimming, boating, and other activities. When there was a baseball game at Eldredge Park, buses would bring the campers to attend; after the game, we would see buses returning to the South Orleans camps and would hear the campers singing. What a joyful sound that was!

Jobs as counsellors were much sought after by college students, some of whom met their future spouses while working at the camps.

Sadly, increasing governmental regulations made the cost of operating the camps prohibitive by the mid-1970s. Unable to make a profit, one camp after another closed; the land was subdivided and the rustic cabins replaced by upscale homes. 

A summer beach on Cape Cod.


Another summer delight was the carnival sponsored every year by the American Legion. The carnival, eagerly anticipated by both children and adults, came for a week and was always well attended. My favorite ride was the merry-go-round, although the flying swings were a close second. I avoided the Ferris wheel, where teenage guys liked to rock the cars.

Some older friends once took me on the Octopus; once was definitely enough!


There were many games such as throwing darts to break balloons; picking a lucky plastic duck from its moving stream; pulling a string to reveal a door with a prize behind it, etc. One game involved jewelry prizes; a high-school boyfriend won me a ring and my mother quipped that she had never expected her daughter to get engaged at the carnival!

Also offered were a host of interesting edibles: candy apples, cotton candy, etc. The carnival was where I learned to appreciate vinegar on French fries! My mother used to warn me, for reasons of food safety, against eating hot dogs or hamburgers at a carnival. I remember as a young child seeing people eating just such items there and wishing I knew their names so I could check for them in the obituary columns! 


The camps and the carnivals are fond memories now, but people still come to swim, sail, and sunbathe; to hike the nature trails and ride the bike paths; and to enjoy this unique place where we are privileged to live. Long may it be so!

Mary E. McDermott is a 13th-generation Cape Codder living in Orleans. She worked for 17 years in the Orleans Assessor’s Office and 23 years as a commercial insurance broker at Pike Insurance Agency. She has been a justice of the peace to solemnize marriages since 1976 and has previously published two books of poetry, Tapestry and Handle with Care. Her poems have appeared in several publications including the Christian Science Monitor.

Read more about Cape Cod in Mary E. McDermott’s book Old Orleans, Memories of a Cape Cod Town.

Take a Cape Cod book to the beach with Moon Tide: Cape Cod Poems by Mary Petiet.

Outside of Time

Grab your camera and notebook!

Wooden boats and piers. Waving marsh grass and sandy beaches. If you stand back and squint, Cape Cod becomes a place outside of time.

This is where inspiration comes from.

I wander with a notebook and a camera and I record the timelessness between the words that come and the images I find.

Put simply, to create poetry I stand back and squint. I take long walks and pay attention. I allow myself to inhabit the landscape.

This slideshow is a visual sample of what I’ve found.

Cape Cod has many moods.

My photography is point and click, nothing sophisticated, but I love to try to capture the mood, and sometimes I manage it. I actually dream of painting it one day.

My writing springs from the landscape I photograph. It’s all one thing in its way.

So grab your camera and notebook. Watch and listen. See through all your senses. The words are there, the pictures are there, even the paintings are there.

You can find our books wherever good books are sold. Ask at your local bookstore, and if you’re in Orleans, find them at Sea Howl, Cottage Cape Cod, and Oceana.

Cemetery Musings

“If in heaven
There is no wit
You’ll know she went
To hell for it.”

Cemeteries have fascinated me ever since the days when I would accompany my mother and aunt to place geraniums on the family graves for Memorial Day. As anyone knows who has taken Bonnie Snow’s cemetery tour, burial grounds give one a sense of connection with our history.


The Orleans Cemetery is the final resting place of Isaac Snow, who was instrumental in naming the town and who was our last surviving Revolutionary War veteran. Also interred here are “Uncle Harvey” Sparrow, who served in the War of 1812, and Webster Rogers, the longest-lived of our Spanish-American war veterans. Webster’s daughter, Emma Augusta Rogers, known as “Emma Gusty”, made her own graduation dress, but her father would not allow her to attend the ceremony. She vowed to be buried in the dress, and she was, over 70 years later!


One of my family graves has a tragic story. My great-aunt Myrtice Chase, wife of my great-uncle Ernie, was a young wife of 23, having her first child. According to family lore, she was given ether, which her lungs could not tolerate; she died and the baby died with her. She was buried with the baby still in utero, and her husband never knew if it would have been a son or a daughter. 

A New England Grave Yard in the Fall.

On a happier note, the cemetery holds the remains of Dr Claude Heaton, who delivered Margaret Mead’s daughter, Mary Catherine Bateson. Apparently, Mead wanted either a home birth or natural childbirth or both, and Dr Heaton was the only physician who would agree to her wishes. Mother and daughter came through the experience in good health. as she relates in her autobiography.

At the top of the hill is Barna Sprague’s gravestone, with the face of a dog carved into each of the top corners. These canine faces represent her two yellow Labs, Breeze and Daisy; Barna died while trying to rescue Breeze from a fire which destroyed her home. (Daisy escaped.) It was typical of Barna to risk her life for a beloved pet; her heart brimmed with compassion for animals.


But cemeteries can also hold unexpected flashes of humor. Consider the stone of John and Grace Lyons. She was the first to pass, and her epitaph reads, “If in heaven/There is no wit/You’ll know she went/ To hell for it.” After his death much later, his epitaph was inscribed: “Thirty years later/Still loving his Grace,/He hoped to meet her/Either place!”


I encourage everyone to take a walk in a cemetery. There is always much to be learned.

Mary E. McDermott is a 13th-generation Cape Codder living in Orleans. She worked for 17 years in the Orleans Assessor’s Office and 23 years as a commercial insurance broker at Pike Insurance Agency. She has been a justice of the peace to solemnize marriages since 1976 and has previously published two books of poetry, Tapestry and Handle with Care. Her poems have appeared in several publications including the Christian Science Monitor.

Sea Crow Press has two books about Cape Cod.

read more about Old Orleans in Mary E. McDermott’s new book

take some poetry to the beach with Moon Tide by Mary Petiet